SSHAP 2021

Ninth Annual Meeting, Online

University of Vienna, Austria, July 14-16, 2021

The ninth annual conference of the Society for the Study of the History of Analytical Philosophy (SSHAP) will be held online on July 14-16, 2021. The conference is organized and hosted by University of Vienna – Department of Philosophy, under the leadership of Georg Schiemer and Florian Kolowrat. The main local sponsors and supporters are Institute Vienna Circle of University of Vienna and Vienna Circle -Society for the Advancement of the Scientific World Conception.

Details of registration and Zoom access will be provided later in June. Please also check the conference website.

For further information please contact the organizing-team at the University of Vienna: sshap2021.philosophy@univie.ac.at

Keynote Speakers

Detailed Information

Mentoring Program

In cooperation with the editorial board of the Journal for the History of Analytic Philosophy (JHAP), the organizers of SSHAP2021 are planning to install a mentoring program related to the meeting. The idea is to match junior scholars with senior mentors in their field who might be willing read the paper they are presenting and to give them some feedback to help prepare the papers for publication (ideally in JHAP). If you are interesting in participating in the program either as a PhD/early postdoctoral scholar or a senior mentor, please fill out the short form below:

https://forms.gle/S8XEQVujCg24mbKe7

Many thanks to Audrey Yap (University of Victoria), editor-in-chief of JHAP, for setting up the form.

SSHAP 2021 Program

The Society for the Study of the History of Analytic Philosophy 2021 Annual Meeting will be held online, July 14-16, 2021, organized and hosted by the Department of Philosophy of the University of Vienna. The program follows below. Abstracts will be posted when available.

  • Talks are 45 minutes including Q&A.
  • There will be 5-10 minutes between talks for rest and to switch to another Zoom session.
  • Some symposia have a slightly different time structure from the standard times of the left-most column below, and in these cases times are given for each participant or event of the symposium.
  • All times are Central European Summer Time (CEST)

Wednesday, July 14, 2021

  Zoom 1 Zoom 2 Zoom 3 Zoom 4 Zoom 5
  Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
HOAP
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
FREGE
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
CARNAP
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
WITTGENSTEIN
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
ANALYTIC/CONTINENTAL
09:00-09:45 Sebastian Sunday, GREVE
“Turing’s Philosophy of Intelligence”
Sorin, COSTREIE
“Fregean Acquaintance”
Naomi, OSORIO-KUPFERBLUM
“Ryle’s and Carnap’s Impact on Goodman’s Notions of Linguistic Aboutness”
Michael, SCHMITZ
“Wittgenstein contra Frege on Force”
Michal, DOBRANSKI
“Arthur Schopenhauer’s Philosophy of Language: from German Idealism towards Analytical Philosophy”
09:55-10:40 Chen, BO
“Russell and Jin Yuelin on Truth: A Comparative Study”
Tabea, ROHR
“Frege on Geometry”
Giorgio, CASTIGLIONE
“A ‘Third Man’ in the Debate? Arthur Pap’s Conception of the A Priori between Carnap and Quine”
Giovanni, MION
“Did Wittgenstein read Cassirer?”
Aleksandra, GOMULCZAK
“An Attempt to recognize the Relationship between Analytic and Continental Philosophy”
10:50-11:35 Chengcheng, GU
“A Comparative Study of Shen Yu-ting and Husserl’s Theory of Meaning”
Indrek, LOBUS
“Frege Against Textbook Logical Atoms”
Flavio, BARACCO
“Carnap’s Intellectual Development in the Early 1920s: Encounters with Husserl’s Circle”
Florian, FIGUEIREDO
“Wittgenstein and the Conception of Hypotheses”
Maximilian, NOICHL
“Quantifying the Analytic/Continental Divide”
11:45-12:30   Anton, ALEXANDROV
“Is Frege’s Logical Analysis of Arithmetical Notions an Instance of Carnapian Explication?”
Robert, MICHELS
“Lewis’s Counterpart Theory and the Aufbau”
Anton, LEODOLTER
“An Arduous Journey – The Concept ‘Illusion in Wittgenstein Scholarship and Cavell’s Solution”
Eugenio, PETROVICH
“Uncovering the Social Network of Recent Analytic Philosophy by the Analysis of Acknowledgments in Academic Publications”
12:30-14:00 Lunch Break
  Chair: Name, LAST NAME, Symposium
Scientific Philosophy
Chair: Name, LAST NAME, Symposium
Brentano and the Origins of Analytic Philosophy
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
Russell
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
HOAP
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
Philosophy of Mathematics
14:00-14:45 Gabriella, CROCCO
“Emile Boutroux and “Scientific” Philosophy”
Mark, TEXTOR
“Stout’s take on the Tripartite Distinction”
Ryo, ITO
“Two Epistemological Problems in the early Russell’s Ontology”
João Esteves, DA SILVA
“Reading Wittgenstein with Ryle: Reconsidering the Roots of Non-Metaphysical Readings of the Tractatus”
Claudio, TERNULLO and Luca ZANETTI
“Cantor’s Abstractionism and Hume’s Principle”
14:55-15:40 Francesca, BIAGIOLI and Michael, STOELTZNER
“How Far Should Concepts Grow? Federigo Enriques on Mathematics, its Justification and its Application”
Rory, MADDEN
“Self-Awareness in G.E. Moore’s ‘Refutation of Idealism’”
Nikolay, MILKOV
“Bertrand Russell’s Philosophical Logic and Its Logical Forms”
Jann Paul, ENGLER
“The early early Wittgenstein on Ramified Types”
Inger Bakken, PEDERSEN
“Coherentist Structuralism: A Metaontological Inquiry”
15:50-16:35 Flavia, PADOVANI
“Scientific Philosophy in Exile: Reichenbach and Rougier”
Consuelo, PRETI
“The Extrusion of Thought from the Mind: Brentano and Moore on the Nature of Judgment”
Joan, BERTRAN SAN-MILLÁN
“Russell and Peano on the Independence of the Axioms of Arithmetic”
Alexander, KLEIN
“From Willing to Meaning: William James on Mental Content”
Gareth, PEARCE
“Why Formalism died too early and why Lewis should have brought it back”
16:45-17:30 Panel Discussion (Garbriella CROCCO, Francesca BIAGIOLI, Michael STOELTZNER and Flavia PADOVANI)   Russel, WAHL
“Russell and Kant: The Question of Intuition, revisited, or Did Russell misunderstand Kant?”
   
           
18:00-19:30 Keynote: Catarina, DUTILH NOVAES,
“Carnap meets Foucault: Explication and Genealogy”
           
  Chair: Name, LAST NAME, Symposium
Mathematical Definitions in Early Analytic Philosophy
Chair: Name, LAST NAME, Symposium
Representation and Logic in Wittgenstein’s Tractatus
     
19:45-20:30 Erich, RECK
“On Frege’s and Dedekind’s Definitions of Number”
* 19:45-20:00
Mahmoud, JALLOH
“Structuralism in the Tractatus
* 20:00-20:15
Sophia, ARBEITER
“Representation and Truth in the Tractatus
* 20:15-20:30
Comments on Jalloh and Arbeiter
     
20:40-21:25 Paola CANTÙ
“Definitions in the Peano School”
* 20:40-20:55
Summary/More Comments/Q&A
* 20:55-21:10
Joshua, EISENTHAL
“Propositions as Pictures”
* 21:10-21:25
Sanford, SHIEH
“Possibility and the Undepictability of Form in Wittgenstein’s Tractatus
     
21:35-22:20 Sean, MORRIS
“Russell on Philosophical and Mathematical Definitions in Principles of Mathematics”
* 21:35-21:50
Summary/Comments on Eisenthal & Shieh
* 21:50-22:00
Response Comments & Discussion
* 22:00-22:20
General Discussion / Q&A
     

Thursday, July 15, 2021

  Zoom 1 Zoom 2 Zoom 3 Zoom 4 Zoom 5
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
Logic & Probability
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
Vienna Circle
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
HOAP
09:00-09:45 Marta, SZNAJDER
“Janina Hosiasson: between subjective and objective Probability”
Adam Tamas, TUBOLY
“Otto Neurath on Plato-Hitler and the British Scene of Irritation”
Michael Oliva, CORDOBA
“A “want of clearness” in §13 of Moore’s Principia Ethica”
09:55-10:40 Francesco A., GENCO and Francesca POGGIOLESI
“A Solution to the Paradoxes of Grounding Inspired by Bolzano”
Andreas, VRAHIMIS
“Biology and Epistemology in the early Schlick”
José, MESTRE
“Are Thoughts Propositions?”
10:50-11:35 David, KASHTAN
“Paradox wasn’t (and isn’t) the Motivation for Tarski’s Truth”
John, PRESTON
“Paul Feyerabend’s Ernst Mach”
Jamie, ELLIOTT
“Anscombe and ‘I'”
11:45-12:30 Pawel, POLAK
“The Specificity of the Lvov-Warsaw School Philosophy of Science: A Case of Reception of Special and General Relativity ”
Philipp Leon, BAUER
“Waismann’s Time in Vienna”
12:30-14:00 Lunch Break
Chair: Dejan, MAKOVEC, Symposium
Waismann
Chair: Name, LAST NAME, Symposium
Social Justice and the History of Analytic Philosophy
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
Carnap – Quine
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
HOAP
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
Philosophy of Mathematics
14:00-14:45 Christoph, LIMBECK-LILIENAU
“Waismann on Rules and Hypotheses”
Anna, BROZEK
“Social Justice from the Point of View of the Lvov-Warsaw School”
Sander, VERHAEGH
“Carnap and Quine: First Encounters”
Teresa, KOURI KISSEL
“Susan Stebbing on Logical Atomism”
Eduardo N., GIOVANNINI
“Hilbert’s Early Views on Completeness and Categoricity”
14:55-15:40 Bastian, STOPPELKAMP
“Social Substructures of Logic”: Friedrich Waismann and the Concept of “Style” in the Vienna Circle
Frederique, JANSSEN-LAURET
“Early Analytic Female Logicians: Combating the Great Men Narrative of Analytic Philosophy”
Michael Robert, HICKS
“Sellars on Carnap and Conceptual Voluntarism”
James, PEARSON
“Writing Conversationalists into History: The Case of Burton Dreben”
Benjamin, MARSCHALL
“Quine’s Empiricist Platonism”
15:50-16:35 Annalisa, COLIVA
“Family Resemblances and “Metaphilosophy”: Waismann, Wittgenstein and Goethe”
Dwight, LEWIS
“Cultural Epistemology: A Query of Physicalism and an Investigation into Patricia Hill Collins’ ‘outsider within”
Gary, EBBS
“Do Carnap and Quine Disagree about Explication?”
Luca, OLIVA
“Analyticity in Wittgenstein”
Julien, OUELLETTE-MICHAUD
“Notational Bearings on Conceptions of Assumptions”
16:45-17:30 Panel Discussion: Annalisa Coliva, Greg Lavers, Christoph Limbeck-Lilienau, Gillian Russell, Bastian Stoppelkamp Matt, LAVINE
“An Introduction to Social Justice and the History of Analytic Philosophy”
Sam Whitman, MCGRATH
“On ‘Ontology’: Analyzing the Carnap-Quine Debate as a Case of Metalinguistic Negotiation”
Warren, GOLDFARB
“Conjuring with the Beetle”
Gregory, LANDINI
“Gödel’s Diagonal Function Doesn’t Exist without Numbers”
18:00-19:30 Keynote: Martin, KUSCH,
“Is Georg Simmel Part of the History of Analytic Philosophy?”
Chair: Name, LAST NAME, Symposium
Frege on Definition, Truth, and Logic as Science
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
HOAP
19:45-20:30 Rachel, BODDY
“Definition and the Proof of Referentiality”
Landon, ELKIND
“Computer Verification for Historians of Philosophy?”
20:40-21:25 Robert, MAY
“The Role of Truth”
Roberta, BALLARIN
“Carnap and Quine on Ontology and Categories”
21:35-22:20 Sanford, SHIEH
“Notes on Logical Alien Science”
Richard, CREATH
“Reciprocal Containment and the Aufbau”

Friday, July 16, 2021

  Zoom 1 Zoom 2 Zoom 3 Zoom 4 Zoom 5
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
Tractatus
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
HOAP
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
HOAP
09:00-09:45 Jonathan, GOMBIN
“Simplex Sigillum Veri: the Tractatus on the Simplicity of Logic”
Dominik, JARCZEWSKI
“Towards an Activist Epistemology. The Neglected Project of C. I. Lewis”
Matthias, NEUBER
“Perry on the Ego-Centric Predicament”
09:55-10:40 Shunichi, TAKAGI
“The Genealogy of the Tractarian ‘Ontology'”
Ewelina, GRADZKA
“Kazimierz Twardowski’s View on Teaching Philosophy at School in the Context of Analytical Philosophy ”
Felix, DANOWSKI
“How Ayer could be right about Moral Arguments”
10:50-11:35 Yi, JIANG
“On Reverse Reading of the Tractatus, for Celebration of the Centennial of Publication of the Tractatus”
Henri, WAGNER
“An Externalist Strand in C. I. Lewis’s Mind and the World Order”
Kenneth, BOYD
“I’m Not Actually Perfectly Delighted To See You: Peirce On Shared Responsibility For Assertion”
11:45-12:30 Christopher Alan, CAMPBELL
“Generality and the Enumerability of Instances in Wittgenstein’s Tractatus and Beyond”
Martijn, WALLAGE
“Is a Person an Object of Reference?”
12:30-14:00 Lunch Break
Chair: Mathieu, MARION, Symposium
Debunking The Standard Narratives In The History Of Logic
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
Tractatus
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
Quine
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
Frege
Chair: Name, LAST NAME,
HOAP
14:00-14:45 * 14:10-14:30
Julie, BRUMBERG-CHAUMONT
“A Social History of Logic : Problems and Methods”
Silver, BRONZO
“Thought, Language, and Expression in Wittgenstein’s Tractatus”
Jonas, RAAB
“Quine on Explication”
Richard, LAWRENCE
“Frege and Formalism: an Apology for Thomae”
Aviezer, TUCKER
“The Pre-history of Analytical Philosophy of History”
14:55-15:40 *14:30-14:50
Catarina, DUTILH NOVAES
“The Roots of Deduction. A Conceptual Genealogy”
Jordi, FAIRHURST
“Ethics is Transcendental (Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, 6.421)”
Artur, KOSECKI
“On Ajdukiewicz’s and Quine’s Views on Ontology”
Stephen, MACKERETH
“Heck’s Two-Sorted Frege Arithmetic and the Neo-Fregean Program”
Samuel, DESCARREAUX
“Can 19th Century Early Neo-Kantian Naturalism be relevant for Contemporary Debates on Naturalistic Epistemology?”
15:50-16:35 *15:00-15:40
Sandra, LAPOINTE
“What is a Disciplinary History of Logic? ”
David, HYDER
“Locality in the Tractatus”
Andrew, SMITH
“Quine’s Unpublished 1985 Typescript “Convention and Its Place in Truth”
Dongwoo, KIM
“Analysis and Reference in Frege”
Matt, CARLSON
“Traditional Epistemology and Epistemology Naturalized”
16:45-17:30 *15:40-16:00
John David, LOHNER
“Canonizing Wittgenstein. A Social Historian’s Assessment.”
Edward, GUETTI
“No Surprises: Insight and Limit-Concepts in the Tractatus”
Gary, KEMP
A Conflict in Quine? Ontological Relativity vs Naturalism
Jim, HUTCHINSON
“Frege’s Radical Anti-Psychologism”
*16:00-16:40
Sara L., UCKELMANN
“Building a History of Women in Logic”
18:00-19:30 Annual General Meeting of SSHAP
Roundtable On Early Analytic Women Philosophers
19:45-19:55 Introduction by Annalisa, COLIVA
19:55-20:15 Frederique, JANSSEN-LAURET
“Victoria Welby as a Grandmother of Analytic Philosophy”
20:25-20:45 Gary, OSTERTAG
“E. E. Constance Jones on Predication”
20:55-21:15 Annalisa, COLIVA
“Susan Stebbing’s “The Method of Analysis in Metaphysics””
21:25-21:45 Juliet, FLOYD
“Susanne K. Langer”
21:45-22:15 General Q&A

Frege’s Choice: The Indefinability Argument, Truth, and the Fregean Conception of Judgment / Review of Thinking and Being

Volume 9.5 of The Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy (JHAP) has now been published online, with full open-access:

https://jhaponline.org/jhap/issue/view/444

It features an article by Junyeol Kim entitled, “Frege’s Choice: The Indefinability Argument, Truth, and the Fregean Conception of Judgment”. Here is the abstract:

I develop a new reading of Frege’s argument for the indefinability of truth. I concentrate on what Frege literally says in the passage that contains the argument. This literal reading of the passage establishes that the indefinability argument is an arguably sound argument to the following conclusion: provided that the Fregean conception of judgment—which has recently been countered by Hanks—is correct and that truth is a property of truth-bearers, a vicious infinite regress is produced. Given this vicious regress, Frege chooses to reject that truth is a property of truth-bearers. Frege’s choice leads to a unique version of the Fregean conception of judgment. His unique conception of judgment can cope with Hanks’s recent criticisms against the Fregean conception.

The volume also contains a review of Irad Kimhi, Thinking and Being (Harvard University Press, 2018), written by Jean Philippe Narboux.

JHAP is a free, open-access, peer-reviewed journal. It is available at https://jhaponline.org/. Submissions welcome!

Concepts of the Psyche: Wittgenstein on Mental Phenomena

Volume 9.4 of The Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy (JHAP) has now been published online, with full open-access:

https://jhaponline.org/jhap/issue/view/435

It consists of five papers originally presented at the conference Concepts of the Psyche: Wittgenstein on Mental Phenomena that took place at Beijing Normal University, and was edited by Yi Jiang (Shanxi University) and Stefan Majetschak (University of Kassel):

“Wittgenstein on Understanding and Emotion: Grammar and Methods” by Francis Yunqing Lin: https://jhaponline.org/jhap/article/view/4682

“‘A misleading parallel’: Wittgenstein on Conceptual Confusion in Psychology and the Semantics of Psychological Concepts” by Stefan Majetschak: https://jhaponline.org/jhap/article/view/4683

“Philosophical Concepts, the Ideal of Sublimation, and the ‘Unpredictability of Human Behaviour'” by Anja Weiberg: https://jhaponline.org/jhap/article/view/4684

“Wittgenstein and Folk Psychology” by Yi Jiang: https://jhaponline.org/jhap/article/view/4685

“A Critical Discussion of the ‘Memory-Challenge’ to Interpretations of the Private Language Argument” by Zhao Fan: https://jhaponline.org/jhap/article/view/4688

JHAP is a free, open-access, peer-reviewed journal. It is available at https://jhaponline.org/. Submissions welcome!

SSHAP 2021 in Vienna will be online, July 14-16

The Ninth Annual SSHAP Meeting at the University of Vienna will now be an online conference, to be held on Zoom from July 14-16, 2021. The schedule of talks will be posted here when it become available. It will also be available at the conference site: https://sshapvienna2021.univie.ac.at

We again Georg Schiemer, Florian Kolowrat, and the rest of the organizing team at University of Vienna – Department of Philosophy, for making this possible. We are also grateful for the support of Institute Vienna Circle of University of Vienna and Vienna Circle -Society for the Advancement of the Scientific World Conception.

As announced last April, elections for officers and members of the Board of SSHAP will take place in 2021; there will be a Zoom session for this purpose.

Our best wishes to all for your safety and health.

Kripke’s Wittgenstein and Semantic Factualism


Volume 9.3 of The Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy (JHAP) has now been published online, with full open-access:

https://jhaponline.org/jhap/issue/view/427

It features an article by Miloš Šumonja, called “Kripke’s Wittgenstein and Semantic Factualism.” Here is the abstract:

Recently, two new portrayals of Kripke’s Wittgenstein (KW) have emerged. Both understand KW as targeting the Tractarian picture of semantic fact as a speaker’s mental representation of the truth-conditions of the sentences he uses. According to the factualist interpretation, KW holds that meaning ascriptions are legitimate descriptions because semantic facts are not entities that explain people’s linguistic behavior. The second, Alex Miller’s non-standard non-factualist interpretation, sees KW as claiming that because no fact can explain our linguistic behavior, meaning ascriptions express a speaker’s attitudes towards his interlocutors rather than stating what they mean. This paper advances the minimal factualist interpretation by elaborating two points: that Miller’s reading of the skeptical argument contradicts semantic non-factualism; and that KW’s view of meaning is based on a primitivist rendition of the skeptic’s insight that nothing justifies our use of language, which allows him to assert that semantic facts exist simply because we ordinarily say so.

JHAP is a free, open-access, peer-reviewed journal. It is available at https://jhaponline.org/. Submissions welcome!

Transfinite Number in Wittgenstein’s Tractatus / Review of work on Ramsey

Volume 9.2 of The Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy (JHAP) has now been published online, with full open-access.

It features an article by James Connelly entitled, “Transfinite Number in Wittgenstein’s Tractatus”. Here is the abstract:

In his highly perceptive, if underappreciated introduction to Wittgenstein’s Tractatus, Russell identifies a “lacuna” within Wittgenstein’s theory of number, relating specifically to the topic of transfinite number. The goal of this paper is two-fold. The first is to show that Russell’s concerns cannot be dismissed on the grounds that they are external to the Tractarian project, deriving, perhaps, from logicist ambitions harbored by Russell but not shared by Wittgenstein. The extensibility of Wittgenstein’s theory of number to the case of transfinite cardinalities is, I shall argue, a desideratum generated by concerns intrinsic, and internal to Wittgenstein’s logical and semantic framework. Second, I aim to show that Wittgenstein’s theory of number as espoused in the Tractatus is consistent with Russell’s assessment, in that Wittgenstein meant to leave open the possibility that transfinite numbers could be generated within his system, but did not show explicitly how to construct them. To that end, I show how one could construct a transfinite number line using ingredients inherent in Wittgenstein’s system, and in accordance with his more general theories of number and of operations.

The volume also contains a review of Cheryl Misak, Frank Ramsey: A Sheer Excess of Powers (Oxford University Press, 2020), written by Matthew Simpson.

JHAP is a free, open-access, peer-reviewed journal. It is available at https://jhaponline.org/. Submissions welcome!

Rudolf Carnap and David Lewis on Metaphysics: A Question of Historical Ancestry

Volume 9.1 of The Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy (JHAP) has now been published online, with full open-access:

https://jhaponline.org/jhap/issue/view/421

It features an article by Fraser MacBride, called ” Rudolf Carnap and David Lewis on Metaphysics: A Question of Historical Ancestry.” Here is the abstract:

In an unpublished speech from 1991, David Lewis told his audience that he counted ‘the metaphysician Carnap (not to be confused with the anti-metaphysician Carnap, who is better known)’ amongst his historical ancestors. Here I provide a novel interpretation of the Aufbau that allows us to make sense of Lewis’s claim. Drawing upon Lewis’s correspondence, I argue it was the Carnap of the Aufbau whom Lewis read as a metaphysician, because Carnap’s appeal to the notion of founded relations in the Aufbau echoes Lewis’s own appeal to the metaphysics of natural properties. I further maintain that Lewis was right to read Carnap this way and that the notion of a founded relation has a legitimate claim to be both logical and metaphysical. I also argue that Carnap’s initial response to Goodman’s puzzle about ‘grue’ relies upon a metaphysics of simple properties which also prefigures Lewis’s own response to Goodman invoking natural properties.

JHAP is a free, open-access, peer-reviewed journal. It is available at https://jhaponline.org/. Submissions welcome!

Coming to America: Carnap, Reichenbach and the Great Intellectual Migration

Volume 8.11 of The Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy (JHAP) has now been published online, with full open-access.

It features a two-part article by Sander Verhaegh, called “Coming to America: Carnap, Reichenbach and the Great Intellectual Migration” with Part I on Rudolf Carnap and Part II on Hans Reichenbach. Here are the abstracts:

Part I: Rudolf Carnap.

In the years before the Second World War, Rudolf Carnap and Hans Reichenbach emigrated to the United States, escaping the quickly deteriorating political situation on the continent. Once in the U. S., the two significantly changed the American philosophical climate. This two-part paper reconstructs Carnap’s and Reichenbach’s surprisingly numerous interactions with American academics in the decades before their move in order to explain the impact of their arrival in the late 1930s. Building on archival material of several key players and institutions, I take some first steps toward answering the question why logical empiricism became so successful in the United States after the War. This first part reconstructs Carnap’s development between 1923, when he first visited New York, and 1936, when he was offered a position at the University of Chicago. I describe Carnap’s first substantive contacts with American philosophers as well as the events leading up to his decision to emigrate. In addition, I argue that some of Carnap’s work from the mid-1930s—in particular “Testability and Meaning”—can be better understood if we take into account (1) his attempts to correct the American narrative about logical positivism and (2) his increasingly desperate efforts to find a position in the United States.


Part II: Hans Reichenbach

In the late 1930s, a few years before the start of the Second World War, a small number of European philosophers of science emigrated to the United States, escaping the increasingly perilous situation on the continent. Among the first expatriates were Rudolf Carnap and Hans Reichenbach, arguably the most influential logical empiricists of their time. In this two-part paper, I reconstruct Carnap’s and Reichenbach’s surprisingly numerous interactions with American academics in the decades before their move in order to explain the impact of their arrival in the late 1930s. This second part traces Reichenbach’s development and focuses on his frequent interactions with American academics throughout the 1930s. I show that Reichenbach was quite ignorant about developments in Anglophone philosophy in the first stages of his career but became increasingly focused on the United States from the late 1920s onwards. I reconstruct Reichenbach’s efforts to find a job across the Atlantic and show that some of his English publications—most notably Experience and Prediction—were attempts to change the American narrative about logical empiricism. Whereas U. S. philosophers identified scientific philosophy with the views of the Vienna Circle, Reichenbach aimed to market his probabilistic philosophy of science as a subtler alternative.

JHAP is a free, open-access, peer-reviewed journal. It is available at https://jhaponline.org/. Submissions welcome!